Don’t waste time on Strategy Deployment (Hoshin Kanri) | David Bovis

“Where people put the effort into it and understand the principles and why they work fully, Hoshin Kanri can unlock enormous potential throughout an organisation.”

Source: www.linkedin.com

Michel Baudin‘s comments:

Great article. As a condition for success in implementing Hoshin Planning, at least in Manufacturing, I would add timing. The organization must be ready for it, and it is, for example, after a number of successful, local improvement projects have led people to say “These are great, but what do they add up to? And where do they lead us?” Hoshin Planning can then help them figure out their own answers and provide a structure for moving forward.

In the list of failure causes for Hoshin Planning, I would also add the lingering influence of Management-By-Objectives (MBO), which keeps managers obsessed with gaming metrics instead of doing the work. I think it is what you mean when you say that Hoshins should not be formulated in terms of metrics, but it should be made clear that Hoshin Planning replaces MBO; it is not an add-on to it.

See on Scoop.itlean manufacturing

Organizational Sabotage – The Malpractice of Management By Objective by Ken Craddock & Kelly Allan

See on Scoop.itlean manufacturing

Organizational Sabotage – The Malpractice of Management By Objective by Ken Craddock & Kelly Allan – Innovation, quality and productivity suffer from the abuse of MBOs Objectives are essential to a business.

Michel Baudin‘s insight:

This article brings a new perspective on the discussion of the same topic in this blog.

See on www.processexcellencenetwork.com

HBR doubles down on MBO

See on Scoop.itlean manufacturing

The Harvard Business Review, on its 90th anniversary, equates good management with having long-term goals with tough but achievable short-term performance targets, financial incentives to reward high performers and punish underperformers, and a monitoring system to rigorously collect and analyze performance data.
If you don’t have these things, then, by definition, your company is badly managed. After conducting a worldwide survey, the article’s authors concluded that, indeed, most companies are.
Management By Objectives, anyone? I thought we were moving past that debate.
See on hbr.org