It was about Ferdinand Porsche

Last week, I posted a quote about a car industry executive and asked you to guess who it was from a list of famous leaders. 12 of the 29 respondents thought is was about Taiichi Ohno, and only 5 about Ferdinand Porsche, the designer of the best selling car in history, the Volkswagen Beetle, among others, including early electric and hybrid cars.

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Which car industry executive is this about?

The following is a quote about a prominent car industry executive:

“The workers at the factory were not used to the boss being so hands-on. Their previous boss was a behind-the-scenes manager and had rarely shown his face on the floor. But he was almost always in their midst. This was a place where distance was part of the work environment and certain lines were just not crossed. He crossed them. The engineers in their clean white coats were offended when he climbed under their test cars and growled at them for not having figured out things he could see quite clearly. They had to get their hands dirty, he said, and stop all this standing around.”

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Car Making in Australia: Welcome to the Lean times | Troy Taylor | Manufacturers’ Monthly

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Welcome to the Lean times
Manufacturers’ Monthly
So why is Toyota’s management style (A.K.A. Lean management) so different from the others? Firstly Toyota’s system is built on 2 pillars that everyone must promote and follow,.

Michel Baudin‘s insight:

Troy Taylor recounts his experience of working at Toyota in the UK and how it survived and thrived while competitors closed plamts. He sees it as showing the way to Australian car makers.

See on www.manmonthly.com.au

Canada, a Model for Australia’s Automotive industry? | Business Spectator

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Work station at Dortec

Work station at Dortec

“Ford Australia’s move to close its two Australian plants from 2016 and transition to import-only brands only reinforces the sense of a looming death knell. But that isn’t the case with every developed-world auto sector struggling to compete with high domestic production costs and cheaper, mostly-Asian-built imports. Canada’s auto sector has also struggled with factors that would sound familiar to an Australian onlooker, such as its own high dollar, volatile domestic demand, offshore competition and wavering government subsidies.

But as much as those conditions in Canada instigated uncertainty, cuts and job losses, that struggle, which gained pace as the global financial crisis took hold, has also produced a level of productivity-focused innovation worth noting for any manufacturer or policymaker wondering if Australia’s auto sector has crossed its rubicon.”

Michel Baudin‘s insight:

Ford is closing its plants in Australia, which threatens the entire local automotive industry. The author looks to Canada for a model Australia could follow for this industry to survive and thrive. The article is mostly about Canada, and specificially about the Magna Dortec door latch plant Northeast of Toronto.

See on www.businessspectator.com.au